When contemplating a shared physical custody schedule for an adolescent, the child’s personality shall be considered.

One of the common arguments in custody cases is that children should be able to spend “equal” time with both parents so that they may develop a meaningful relationship with each parent. Many advocates believe that shared custody by default is in the best interests of the child. However, some children are highly flexible and adapt to being mobile between two homes; others do not.

The child’s unique characteristics such as personality and temperament shall be considered when determining whether shared physical custody is in the best interest of the child.

Quite often I receive phone calls from people who seek a divorce but cannot locate their spouses. Such a situation is not uncommon in our immigrant community. Some people simply go back to their home countries leaving their spouses clueless of their whereabouts.

The due process clauses in the Constitution require the defendant to have notice of a legal proceeding and the right to be heard. But what if you cannot locate the Defendant? Or what if he/she is evasive of service?

In 2015, a New York court granted the plaintiff in a matrimonial case permission to serve the defendant with a divorce summons solely by sending it to him in a private message via Facebook. Since that time, the courts have permitted plaintiffs to serve papers in part through social media platforms and by email.